Contact

Prof. Dr Jason P. Holland

University of Zurich

Department of Chemistry

Winterthurerstrasse 190

Zurich, CH-8057

Switzerland

www.hollandlab.org​​

Tel: +41.44.63.53.990

jason.holland[at]chem.uzh.ch

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Our group combines advanced radiochemistry with state-of-the-art preclinical imaging to develop and translate new radiotracers to the clinic

synthesis
Radiochemistry
Preclinical
imaging
clinical
translation
Overview

Our research is highly interdisciplinary. Projects lie at the interface of chemistry, biochemistry and translational molecular medicine. Our primary aims are to explore interesting new ways of attaching radionuclides to different chemical structures, and simultaneously to develop new imaging agents that can measure biomarker expression for monitoring therapy in cancers and other human diseases. 

Chemical goals focus on identifying new ways of attaching radionuclides to different drug molecules, peptides, proteins, antibodies and nanoparticles. We are particularly interested in finding new chemical methods that allow easy and rapid incorporation of radionuclides including 18F, 64Cu, 68Ga, 90Y, 89Zr, 111In, and 177Lu etc onto various chemical platforms that allow targeted delivery to different cancers.

 

Our research involves organic and inorganic synthesis, computational studies of reaction mechanisms and metal ion bonding using density functional theory, synthesis and characterisation of radioactive molecules, and complete radiotracer development from cellular assays in vitro to full imaging, biodistribution and pharmacokinetic profiling studies in vivo. 

 

We collaborate with physicians at the University Hospital Zurich, and elsewhere, to ensure that our most promising new imaging agents are translated efficiently so patients can benefit from our research, and from the very latest technology, as soon as possible. 

Chemical synthesis & radiotracer design

Modern Radiology and Nuclear Medicine involves a plethora of diagnostic and therapeutic options for managing patients with different pathologies from heart disease and neurological disorders, to cancer. The power of functional and anatomic imaging methods like positron-emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lies in their ability to provide clinically insight into the biochemistry of disease. Successful imaging requires the design, synthesis and validation of target-specific imaging probes.

Our group develops new chemistry to facilitate rapid and efficient radiolabelling of drug molecules, peptides, proteins, antibodies and nanoparticles. We are active in the discovery of new radiolabelling technologies including chelate synthesis, novel bioconjugation strategies, and surface-based methods for chelate-free radiolabelling of different nanomedicines. We are also making hybrid ‘trifunctional’ probes for simultaneous, targeted delivery of PET radionuclides and potent drugs to different cancers. 

Imaging & radiotracer characterisation

Modern Radiology and Nuclear Medicine involves a plethora of diagnostic and therapeutic options for managing patients with different pathologies from heart disease and neurological disorders, to cancer. The power of functional and anatomic imaging methods like positron-emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lies in their ability to provide clinically insight into the biochemistry of disease. Successful imaging requires the design, synthesis and validation of target-specific imaging probes.

Our group develops new chemistry to facilitate rapid and efficient radiolabelling of drug molecules, peptides, proteins, antibodies and nanoparticles. We are active in the discovery of new radiolabelling technologies including chelate synthesis, novel bioconjugation strategies, and surface-based methods for chelate-free radiolabelling of different nanomedicines. We are also making hybrid ‘trifunctional’ probes for simultaneous, targeted delivery of PET radionuclides and potent drugs to different cancers. 

Clinical translation

 

Exploiting the full benefits of molecular imaging lies in our ability to transfer promising preclinical science into useful clinical tools. From the outset, our research programs are designed with the express purpose of delivering technological advances to the patients that need them the most. We work closely with physicians at the University Hospital Zurich (USZ), and beyond, to ensure rapid and smooth translation of our imaging agents from the lab to the clinic. Our diagnostic radiotracers help clinicians make informed decisions about disease status and patient response to treatment. In this way, our work helps 'personalise' medicine, allowing the right treatment to be administered to the right patient, at the right time.

Prospective clients and Collaborators 

 

Are you interested in using imaging science to advance your research? Contact us to discuss the benefits and possibilities.